MONTAGUE DAWSON R.S.M.A.

Homeward Bound

Homeward Bound

MONTAGUE DAWSON R.S.M.A.

1895 - 1973

Title: "Homeward Bound"

Date: c. 1930

Size: Height 30 3/4 inches Width 43 inches (framed)

Considered to be one of the finest marine painters of the 20th century, Montague Dawson was born in 1895. He worked in both oil and watercolour but it is for his large oils of sailing ships under full sail on blue seas which are the most admired and sought after. Much of his work was contracted to Messrs. Frost and Reed, the art dealers who from 1922 handled his work and also the reproduction rights for limited edition prints. He was born in Chiswick, London and was the son of Henry Thomas Dawson, an engineer and keen yachtsman who also painted marines, and was a great influence on his work, and the grandson of Henry Dawson the landscape painter. At the outbreak of the First World War Montague Dawson joined the Royal Navy and it was as a naval officer in Falmouth that he met Napier Hemy (1841-1917) who had a powerful influence on his work.

Following World War I, he set up his studio as a painter and illustrator, concentrating on historical subjects and portraits of deep water sailing ships, usually in a stiff breeze and a high sea. In the Second World War, he worked for the publication, Sphere, supplying them with pictures of historical events of the war. He could paint the deep sea with absolute assurance and effectiveness. He exhibited at the Royal Academy between 1917 and 1936 and also regularly at the Society of Marine Artists between 1946 and 1964, and was a member of that Society, also a Fellow of the Royal Society of British Artists. Examples of this artist's work may be seen at the National Maritime Museum and also the Imperial War Museum.

This painting depicts a clipper ship forging through the waves beneath a broad expanse of blue skies in a fresh breeze.

This is a magnificent example of Montague Dawson's work, signed and presented in pristine condition.